Recent Changes

Wednesday, October 6

  1. page home edited Welcome to Honors British Literature! This website is an ongoing project being built by Mr. Bar…

    Welcome to Honors British Literature!
    This website is an ongoing project being built by Mr. Bariexca's Spring 2008 Honors British Literature class at Hunterdon Central Regional High School. While it is primarily for use by these students and their families, we hope that teachers or students who find their way here can utilize some of what we create in their own teaching or study of these works.

    About the Course
    The "Honors Brit" curriculum provides a survey of major British canonical works via six core texts: Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, William Shakespeare's Hamlet, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and three plays by Oscar Wilde: An Ideal Husband, A Woman of No Importance, and The Importance of Being Earnest. Supplementary texts include the morality play Everyman and Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal, and parallels to modern works are drawn via the music of The Beatles and the comedy of Sacha Baron Cohen.
    (view changes)
    11:04 am
  2. page home edited Welcome to Honors British Literature! This website is an ongoing project being built by Mr. Bar…

    Welcome to Honors British Literature!
    This website is an ongoing project being built by Mr. Bariexca's Spring 2008 Honors British Literature class at Hunterdon Central Regional High School. While it is primarily for use by these students and their families, we hope that teachers or students who find their way here can utilize some of what we create in their own teaching or study of these works.

    About the Course
    The "Honors Brit" curriculum provides a survey of major British canonical works via six core texts: Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, William Shakespeare's Hamlet, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and three plays by Oscar Wilde: An Ideal Husband, A Woman of No Importance, and The Importance of Being Earnest. Supplementary texts include the morality play Everyman and Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal, and parallels to modern works are drawn via the music of The Beatles and the comedy of Sacha Baron Cohen.
    (view changes)
    11:03 am

Thursday, November 5

  1. page Cymraeg edited ... The Mabinogion is a collection of old Welsh myths and stories and is one of the best well know…
    ...
    The Mabinogion is a collection of old Welsh myths and stories and is one of the best well known. Wales has a reputation for poets and storytellers, historically the Bards were important in recording oral history. In modern times the best known Welsh poet (although he wrote in English) was probably Dylan Thomas
    The title of the page on Wales you gave to us reads: Cymraeg. The Language of Heaven. Why is it called this?
    ...
    the following myth://myth:
    (I'll come back to this when I find it)
    //
    Is it weird watching movies that you've seen in English that are dubbed over in Welsh? Are the translations always the same?
    Doesn't really happen, so I don't know!
    ...
    Are there any major differences between the educational systems of Britain & the US? (Cait)
    Hard for me to say, as I don't know much about the US education system, The UK system breaks down like this
    ...
    as 16.
    Most people go through two schools, a Primary school from 4-11 and then a secondary school from 11-16. In a few places there are three schools, with a middle school taking care of ages 8-12
    Students work towards GCSE exams during year 10 and 11 (ages 14-16) and sit their exams in May of year 11. Some subjects are compulsory (English, Welsh, Maths, Science) others are optional.
    (view changes)
    11:10 am

Wednesday, May 6

  1. page Rosemary edited ... Rosemary "Dew of the Sea" {rose_3.jpg} http://www.flickr.com/photos/gfhsingfgmom/…
    ...
    Rosemary
    "Dew of the Sea"
    {rose_3.jpg} http://www.flickr.com/photos/gfhsingfgmom/2170218103/
    Rosemary is a symbol of remembrance and friendship, which is why it is often carried by people getting married in order to show their love and fidelity. In fact, hundreds of years ago, it was dipped in gold and tied with a ribbon to be given as a keepsake at weddings. It is also said that if you touch a lover with a sprig of rosemary, they will be faithful, therefore further proving why it is used in weddings.The link to the romantics came in the 14th century when Queen Elizabeth of Hungary used rosemary for medicinal purposes to enhance her health and beauty for the King of Poland. According to scientists at the University of Cincinnati, the scent of rosemary is what makes it an effective memory stimulant. It is said that the rosemary plant will grow for thirty three years at which point it reaches "the height of Christ" (when he was crucified) and dies. Another common belief is that rosemary can ward of evil spirits and bad dreams, so some people place it under their pillows.
    {rose1.jpg} http://grow.ars-informatica.ca/images/rosemary.jpg
    (view changes)
    2:31 pm

Wednesday, March 4

  1. page The Nun's Priest's Tale edited ... The Nun's Priest's Tale Scene One ... drecched soore. And whan that pertelote thus her…
    ...
    The Nun's Priest's Tale
    Scene One
    ...
    drecched soore.
    And whan that pertelote thus herde hym roore,
    ...
    herte deere,
    What

    What
    eyleth yow,
    ...
    this manere?
    Ye

    Ye
    been a
    ...
    for shame!
    And

    And
    he answerde,
    ...
    thus: madame,
    I

    I
    pray yow
    ...
    nat agrief.
    By

    By
    god, me
    ...
    swich meschief
    Right

    Right
    now, that
    ...
    soore afright.
    Now

    Now
    god, quod
    ...
    recche aright,
    And

    And
    kepe my
    ...
    foul prisoun!
    Me

    Me
    mette how
    ...
    and doun
    Withinne

    Withinne
    our yeerd,
    ...
    a beest
    Was

    Was
    lyk an
    ...
    maad areest
    Upon

    Upon
    my body,
    ...
    me deed.
    His

    His
    colour was
    ...
    and reed,
    And

    And
    tipped was
    ...
    his eeris
    With

    With
    blak, unlyk
    ...
    his heeris;
    His

    His
    snowte smal,
    ...
    eyen tweye.
    Yet

    Yet
    of his
    ...
    I deye;
    {http://officeimages.microsoft.com/i/0000/MB/j0295/j0295777.gif}
    {http://officeimages.microsoft.com/i/0000/MB/j0200/j0200499.gif} {http://officeimages.microsoft.com/i/0000/MB/j0192/j0192205.gif}
    ...
    Barn: http://officeimages.microsoft.com/i/0000/MB/j0295/j0295777.gif
    Scene Two
    ...
    youre love
    That

    That
    any thyng
    ...
    yow aferd?
    Have

    Have
    ye no
    ...
    a berd?
    Allas!

    Allas!
    and konne
    ...
    of swevenys?
    Nothyng,

    Nothyng,
    God woot,
    ...
    swevene is!
    Swevenes

    Swevenes
    engendren of replecciouns,
    And

    And
    ofte of
    ...
    of complecciouns,
    Whan

    Whan
    humours been
    ...
    a wight.
    Certes,

    Certes,
    this dreem
    ...
    met tonyght
    Cometh

    Cometh
    of greet superfluytee
    Of

    Of
    youre rede colera, pardee,
    Which

    Which
    causeth folk
    ...
    hir dremes
    Of

    Of
    arwes, and
    ...
    rede lemes,
    Of grete beestes, that they wol hem byte,
    Of contek, and of whelpes grete and lyte,
    ...
    of malencolie
    Causeth ful many a man in sleep to cri
    ...
    boles blake,
    Or

    Or
    elles blake
    ...
    him take.
    Of

    Of
    othere humour
    ...
    telle also
    That werken many a man in sleep ful wo
    {1234}
    ...
    Scene Four
    {good_fortune.jpg}
    ...
    herkenth alle:
    Lo,

    Lo,
    how fortune turneth sodeynly
    The

    The
    hope and
    ...
    hir enemy!
    This

    This
    cok, that
    ...
    foxes bak,
    In

    In
    al his
    ...
    he spak,
    And

    And
    seyde, sire,
    ...
    as ye,
    Yet

    Yet
    sholde I
    ...
    helpe me,
    Turneth

    Turneth
    agayn, ye
    ...
    cherles alle!
    A

    A
    verray pestilence
    ...
    yow falle!
    Now

    Now
    am I
    ...
    wodes syde;
    Maugree

    Maugree
    youre heed,
    ...
    heere abyde.
    I

    I
    wol hym
    ...
    that anon!
    The

    The
    fox answerde,
    ...
    be don.
    And as he spak that word, al sodeynly {freedom.jpg}
    ...
    mouth delyverly,
    And

    And
    heighe upon
    ...
    fleigh anon.
    And

    And
    whan the
    ...
    was gon,
    Allas!

    Allas!
    quod he,
    ...
    chauntecleer, allas!
    I

    I
    have to
    ...
    ydoon trespas,
    In

    In
    as muche
    ...
    yow aferd
    Whan

    Whan
    I yow
    ...
    the yerd.
    But,

    But,
    sire, I
    ...
    wikke entente.
    Com

    Com
    doun, and
    ...
    I mente;
    I

    I
    shal seye
    ...
    me so!
    Middle English: http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=cme;idno=CT;rgn=div2;view=text;cc=cme;node=CT%3A7.12
    Images:alphapredator.com/ images/chains.jpg
    (view changes)
    7:18 am

Wednesday, July 16

  1. msg Fennel? message posted Fennel? (deleted)
    8:44 am
  2. msg Fennel? message posted Fennel? (deleted)
    8:43 am

Tuesday, June 17

  1. page Women edited ... {http://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/dumaurier/47.jpg} Fin de Siècle At the time of…
    ...
    {http://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/dumaurier/47.jpg} Fin de Siècle
    At the time of the Victorian Era in England, the roles of women in society had spread throughout the classes. The middle to lower classed roles of women had not changed very much. They were still hoping to marry into higher classes, many of them worked very hard. In addition, all classes of women needed to know how to sing because at this time, it was expected that a woman ready for marriage could sing. However, there were more specific things that women in high classed society were expected to know and do. Among these things, the women were expected to manage the home and the household jobs, but when "out on the town", women were expected to be attending all social parties and balls, dancing, and never be left alone. In fact, a woman would always have an escort and when a woman was walking with another woman you knew that both of them were unmarried. Women were expected to know more than one language. In addition, there were certain traits that a woman was supposed to portray themselves through their looks and body language, the biggest expression of their class and personality was through their clothing.
    ...
    Victorian Fashion {http://fashion-era.com/images/Victorians/janstrp545.jpg}
    Women were defined by their fashions, etiquette, furnishings, social engagements, religious devotion and charitable activity. Women were seen as innocent, virtuous, biddable, dutiful, and had no intellectual opinion. They were expected to be weak and helpless, like a “fragile delicate flower”.
    “ The first purpose of Clothes . . . was not warmth or decency, but ornament. . . . Warmth he [the primitive human being] found in the toils of the chase; or amid dried leaves, in his hollow tree, in his bark shed, or natural grotto: but for Decoration he must have Clothes.” (Thomas Carlyle)
    ...
    http://crayzray.tripod.com/clpage/writtings/other/victorian_women.htm
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/victorian_britain/women_home/ideals_womanhood_02.shtml
    http://livinghistory.wikidot.com/clothing-fashion
    Pictures:
    http://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/dumaurier/47.html
    http://www.fashion-era.com/images/Victorians/1895tailmarb.jpg
    http://www.st-marys.hull.sch.uk/sites/history/images/Victorian_fashions.jpg
    http://fashion-era.com/images/Victorians/janstrp545.jpg

    (view changes)
    5:24 am
  2. page Women edited ... Women were defined by their fashions, etiquette, furnishings, social engagements, religious de…
    ...
    Women were defined by their fashions, etiquette, furnishings, social engagements, religious devotion and charitable activity. Women were seen as innocent, virtuous, biddable, dutiful, and had no intellectual opinion. They were expected to be weak and helpless, like a “fragile delicate flower”.
    “ The first purpose of Clothes . . . was not warmth or decency, but ornament. . . . Warmth he [the primitive human being] found in the toils of the chase; or amid dried leaves, in his hollow tree, in his bark shed, or natural grotto: but for Decoration he must have Clothes.” (Thomas Carlyle)
    ...
    social group. WomenThe mid-nineteenth century lady was a vision of eleganceand grace in beautiful gowns trimmed with frills, lace, ruche and ribbons. The fashion conscious lady created this appearance with a combination of the "uncomfortable and inconvenient" with the "frivolous and decorative." Numerous heavy petticoats, layers of underclothes, metal hoops, tight corsets under-pointed boned bodices of whalebone and steel were hidden by ornately accented undersleeves, collars, pelerines, fans, gloves, hats, and parasols. The finished look was of elegance and grace with an illusion of ease and comfort.
    Women
    were always judged by theirthe presentation of
    {http://www.st-marys.hull.sch.uk/sites/history/images/Victorian_fashions.jpg} Upper-Class Victorian Women
    In the current day, upper class women are free to marry whoever they want and do not have to worry about sexism when it comes to inheritance. However, in Victorian time women had little say in their personal life. Before marriage they were controlled by their fathers and after marriage they were controlled by their husbands. Women were not offered a choice of career or getting a job- their career path was consisted of being a mother and wife and managing the household servants. In the marriage they were supposed to the entertainment for their husbands by singing and/or playing an instrument. Any decisions affecting the family were made by the man and the wife was supposed to support her husband no matter what. The only decisions that women made in the house had to do with which food would be served by the servants and make sure that the children were being taught good and religious morals.
    ...
    Looking back at how the ladies of the upper class lived their life many would believe that they had it easy but that is not true. Unmarried Women would talk together, but marriage gave the women a new role as a manager of house and a mother leaving her with less time to talk with friends. Women in the Victorian era were not allowed to do any work; "Ladies were ladies in those days; they did not do things themselves, they told others what to do and how to do it" (Harrison and Ford, 226). The work was very important and sometimes hard, and a lot was expected of the woman to manage home and household smoothly without failure.
    {http://www.costumes.org/history/victorian/women/fashionplates/june86.jpg} Victorian Women talking
    Appearance:
    They added lots of frills, lace, and the sillhouette changed dramatically. They added bustles at this time and other fancy things. Soon Queen Victoria would set the fashion and folks would follow it faithfully. Intermount Clothing Fashion
    The style of the early 1870s relied on the revival of the polonaise, drawn back, bunched and puffed up into an elaborate arrangement at the rear. The tight-fitting bodice was still short-waisted, the sleeves plain, easy-fitting and finished with a r uffle or cuff, tending to widen slightly at the wrist.
    The earlier want for simplicity and freedom was overwhelmed by a profusion of puffs, ruchings, fringes, ribbons, drapery, flounces with additional headings and edgings, and strange combinations of materials and colours.
    The mid-nineteenth century lady was a vision of eleganceand grace in beautiful gowns trimmed with frills, flounces, lace, braid, fringe, ruche and ribbons. The fashion conscious Victorian lady created this appearance with a mysterious combination of the "uncomfortable and inconvenient" with the "frivolous and decorative." Numerous heavy petticoats, layers of underclothes, metal hoops, tight corsets under-pointed boned bodices of whalebone and steel were hidden by ornately accented undersleeves, collars, pelerines, fans, gloves, hats, and parasols. The finished look was of elegance and grace with an illusion of ease and comfort.
    Work Cited:
    http://www.victorianweb.org/art/costume/nunn9.html
    http://www.victoriana.com/1850sfashion/victorianfashionhistory1850.htm
    http://crayzray.tripod.com/clpage/writtings/other/victorian_women.htm
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/victorian_britain/women_home/ideals_womanhood_02.shtml
    http://livinghistory.wikidot.com/clothing-fashion

    (view changes)
    5:20 am
  3. page Women edited ... Looking back at how the ladies of the upper class lived their life many would believe that the…
    ...
    Looking back at how the ladies of the upper class lived their life many would believe that they had it easy but that is not true. Unmarried Women would talk together, but marriage gave the women a new role as a manager of house and a mother leaving her with less time to talk with friends. Women in the Victorian era were not allowed to do any work; "Ladies were ladies in those days; they did not do things themselves, they told others what to do and how to do it" (Harrison and Ford, 226). The work was very important and sometimes hard, and a lot was expected of the woman to manage home and household smoothly without failure.
    {http://www.costumes.org/history/victorian/women/fashionplates/june86.jpg} Victorian Women talking
    Actions:
    Social parties and balls were held often. Dancing was a favorite pastime among most upper-class women and men. An evening party often would end with a few sets among the four or five couples present. Unmarried women spent a great deal of time with other unmarried women. However, once a woman was married her role was considered manager of the household, and she had much less time than before to walk and talk with former friends.
    Ideals:
    * Womenwere defined by their fashions, etiquette, domestic furnishings, social engagements, religious devotion and charitable activity all served to delineate a universe within which women could demonstrate their power.
    * Motherhood was woman's highest achievement {http://illustratedgallery.com/images/Feb%202002/small/mvc-718s.jpg} Victorain Fashion

    Appearance:
    They added lots of frills, lace, and the sillhouette changed dramatically. They added bustles at this time and other fancy things. Soon Queen Victoria would set the fashion and folks would follow it faithfully. Intermount Clothing Fashion
    (view changes)
    5:10 am

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